Hot Science Experiments How-Tos

How To: Change the physical properties of yellow sulfur

In this tutorial, we learn how to change the physical properties of yellow sulfur. First, take a heat proof water glass and add in 1 teaspoon of sulfur powder. After this, heat the glass on a low flame for a few minutes. After this, the sulfur will start to melt and turn a reddish color. Now, pour the sulfur into some cold water after it's all the way melted and watch the reaction that is occurring. Once cool, you will be able to pick up the sulfur from the water and play with it, although it...

How To: Make a homemade hot air balloon

Think a hot air balloon is something you can only read about in books? Think again. In this six-part science based tutorial, learn how to make your very own hot air balloon using science & the following easy to find materials: plastic bags, plastic drinking straws, thin candles, aluminun foil, tape, and scissors.

How To: Make sodium acetate ("hot ice") in your kitchen

The Mr.G Show presents how to make "hot ice" more commonly known as sodium acetate in the kitchen. You start with one liter of white vinegar which you place into a sauce pan. You add four table spoons of baking soda to the pan being very careful because both chemical together will react an may cause a big mess so be prepared to clean up any boil over that may arise. Wait while this mixture boils down for the real fun to starts. The hot ice created will transform from a liquid to a solid befor...

How To: Understand how metals react in hydrochloric acid

In this video tutorial the instructor talks about Hydrochloric acid (HCL) and how it reacts to a few metals. To try this out take 30 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid in a beaker. You need to employ caution while handling acids, especially if you use strong ones. Now you can throw small pieces of different metals into it carefully to see how it reacts with different metals. For instance when this HCL comes in contact with metals various reaction take place depending up on the metal. Like i...

How To: Make Slimy Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Ooze at Home

It's been a minute since Michael Bay released his tragedy of a remake of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. As a huge fan of the cartoon and the movies from the '90s, I have made it a point to not watch the latest this franchise has to offer—I'm certainly not in the business of ruining my childhood. But the awfulness of the remake aside, the TMNT resurgence means I'm celebrating the comeback of everybody's favorite teenage reptiles. Thankfully, Todd's Kitchen has a tutorial for mutant ooze that's ...

How To: Make a quick and easy compass

This is an easy & simple way to make your home made compass using stuff that can be found in every home. You will need a magnet, a paper clip, a glass of water and a piece of paper. Check out this instructional science video to learn a a quick and easy method of making your own compass. This is a great science experiment to perform with the kids. Make your own compass by following the simple instructions in this science tutorial video.

How To: Dissect a female cow reproductive tract

Want to know what the insides of a cow look like? Well, go no further... these video tutorials will show you the anatomy of a cow reproductive tract, which is suspended by the broad ligament, which has three component parts; the mesometrium (which holds the uterine horns), the mesovarium (which holds the ovary), and the mesosalpinx (which holds the oviduct of the female cow.

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Make a permanent, reusable glow stick

Make a reusable glow stick, glow-in-the-dark-style! Imagine, you'll never have to buy one of those ChemLite's again, because you can reuse this homemade glow stick over and over again. This video tutorial will show you how to make a permanent, reusable glow stick. The materials in this experiment are simple: epoxy resin, straw, and some phosphor powder.

How To: Use a protractor to measure the height of any object

In this video, we learn how to use a protractor to measure the height of any object. First, attach a level to the protractor, followed by a straw at the 45 degree angle. Next, walk back form the object while looking through the straw. Keep walking back until you spot the top of the object through the straw, then measure to the base of the object. After this, you will have an isosceles triangle that has two equal sides. Use these sides to help find what the size of the object is. After this, a...

How To: Rip a Penny in Half

No, we're not lying. But before you try and tear a plain old penny in half, you should probably watch this video first or you may hurt your fingers. While ordinary pennies are very, very difficult to rip, if you get rid of the zinc core you are left with only the thin copper shell, which is itself very easy to tear apart.

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...