How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Make liquid sculptures from a handwarmer

Learn how to make liquid sculptures from a hand warmer in simple steps. First buy an instant reusable hand warmer which has sodium acetate in it and keep it ready. Now use 4 packets of the hand warmer and stir them out with water. Transfer them to a bottle and keep it aside. Take a sodium acetate crystal from a used hand warmer and place it in a plate. Now pour the liquid slowly on the crystal and you can see the liquid turns solid as you pour it. Design your masterpiece using all the liquid....

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Convert grams to moles for chemistry

310tutoring shows viewers how to easily convert Grams to Moles for Chemistry. If you have 120 grams NaOH and we want this in moles we need a periodic table. Now, you need to figure out what the mass is of each individual element in NaOH. You need the mass of Na, O and H. Na mass is 23, O has 16 and H is 1. Add all of these up to get the molar mass of NaOH is 40 g/mol. Now use this to convert 120 g to moles. Now take 120 grams NaOh and multiply this by 1 mol NaOH/ 40 grams NaOH. You can cancel...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Empty a large water bottle in two seconds with a straw

Bottled-beer chuggers the world over already know that letting air into your beverage with a straw makes it pour faster into your mouth. Did you know, however, that the same technique can be modified and used to empty a fluid into another container (or onto the floor) even more quickly? This video will show you how to use a modified straw technique to introduce air into a large bottle of water or other drink bottle, causing the contents to empty at a torrid pace.

How To: Balance a chemical equation easily

In this video, we learn how to balance a chemical equation. First, take a look at both sides of the equation and figure out how many atoms there are for both. Once you write this out, you will have an idea of how unbalanced it is. Now that you've done this, you need to think about how you can make the equation equal. Look at the first line and then see how many you have to add to one side to make both equal to each other. Then, go to the second line and do the same. When finished, you will ha...

How To: Use a rotary evaporator in the chemistry lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Use baby powder to reveal latent fingerprints

This short video shows us how to reveal latent fingerprints on a glass surface by dusting. Anyone interested in forensic science would enjoy trying it as it shows simple steps in dusting and lifting fingerprints. It does not require any chemicals and we can do it with baby powder. The steps involved are so simple and easy to follow that even kids can try it out for fun. This gives a clear idea about fingerprints on different objects like porous, non porous and metals. Enjoy viewing and detect...

How To: There's Metal Hiding in Your Pepto-Bismol and Here's How You Extract It

Got an upset stomach or a little heartburn? America's favorite pink pill will cure it right up. But did you know that there's actually metal hiding in those chewable Pepto-Bismol tablets? Yes, metal. Technically, it's a poor metal, but metal's metal, right? Well, we do tend to eat a lot of iron in our diets, because it carries oxygen throughout our bodies, so consuming metallic minerals isn't anything abnormal. But you'd never think that Pepto-Bismol is actually made up of metal.

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...

How To: Do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces with different types of food. Yeast is a fungus and it has to eat. After it eats, it produces CO2 gas. The bubbles in bread are produced by the CO2 gas from the yeast. Take five different types of food items and measure out the same quantity for each item. In the video it is 8gms of cookie, oil, flour, salt and sugar. Take six glasses of water and mix one packet of yeast in each glass....

How To: Read a vernier caliper

A vernier caliper is a great tool to use if you're interested in measuring things externally, internally, and in some cases the depth. It gives you a precise measurement and includes both metric and inch measurements on the upper and lower part of the scale. It's an easy tool to use and can be helpful in certain situations. So sit back and enjoy this tutorial on how to read a vernier caliper. Enjoy!

How To: Do a flaming ice experiment

In this fascinating "how to" video, you will see how a simple process creates the illusion of ice that is burning. Only a few items are needed to enact this scientific experiment. As the narrator describes, "Calcium carbide reacts with water to form acetylene gas." To illustrate, the video shows a bowl of ice cubes, to which the special ingredient is added. As the ice melts into water, it reacts with the calcium carbide, forming the high flammable acetylene gas, which is often used in welding...

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