How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Make nitric acid

Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make nitric acid. They show three ways to make nitric acid based on two different chemical approaches, both of which can be done using easily accessible materials.

How To: Make a permanent, reusable glow stick

Make a reusable glow stick, glow-in-the-dark-style! Imagine, you'll never have to buy one of those ChemLite's again, because you can reuse this homemade glow stick over and over again. This video tutorial will show you how to make a permanent, reusable glow stick. The materials in this experiment are simple: epoxy resin, straw, and some phosphor powder.

How To: Build a real lava lamp

This is how to make a near professional grade lava lamp. We did this as a chemistry project. We perfected it in a week. This took many hours to do, as we had to get the density just right. We remade it three times, also. At the very end, we combined all of the wax into a huge flask. And then it blew up.

How To: Use baby powder to reveal latent fingerprints

This short video shows us how to reveal latent fingerprints on a glass surface by dusting. Anyone interested in forensic science would enjoy trying it as it shows simple steps in dusting and lifting fingerprints. It does not require any chemicals and we can do it with baby powder. The steps involved are so simple and easy to follow that even kids can try it out for fun. This gives a clear idea about fingerprints on different objects like porous, non porous and metals. Enjoy viewing and detect...

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

How To: Make a homemade hot air balloon

Think a hot air balloon is something you can only read about in books? Think again. In this six-part science based tutorial, learn how to make your very own hot air balloon using science & the following easy to find materials: plastic bags, plastic drinking straws, thin candles, aluminun foil, tape, and scissors.

How To: Balance chemical equations with MyTutorBuddy

Learn how to balance chemical equations with MyTutorBuddy. Learn about this in this video tutorial. There are four easy steps to do this. Step #1 – place 1 by the most complex compound. Step #2 – balance anything that is not an element. Step #3 – balance the elements. Step #4 – multiply by the lowest common multiple. The 4th step doesn’t always come in to play. The video demonstrates with an equation: C3H8 + O2 -> H2O + CO2. But, this equation is not balanced. Using the 1st three steps, the v...

How To: Blow open sealed containers using liquid nitrogen

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to do a liquid nitrogen experiment. The materials required for this experiment are liquid nitrogen and film canisters. This task is very easy, fast and simple to do. Begin by pouring the liquid nitrogen into the film canisters. Then quickly place the film canister lids on. The liquid nitrogen will eventually become a boiling gas and expand about 700 times. Because of the expanding, the pressure will build in the canisters and result in popping lids. T...

How To: Make hydrogen gas with foil and Liquid Plumr

Learn how to make hydrogen with some household chemicals and items. This experiment is dangerous, so please exercise caution. You will use Liquid Plumr for this science experiment, and be warned, Liquid Plumber and hydrogen are dangerous, maybe not the aluminum foil, but the chemicals, definitely. Fill a balloon with it and watch it explode with a close match.

How To: Create an acid-base indicator using purple cabbage

Purple cabbage is a natural indicator and this video teaches you how to easily prepare purple cabbage in the comfort of your own home to be used as an acid and base indicator. Take one leaf of your purple cabbage, tear it into smaller pieces and place all the pieces into a beaker or bowl of boiling water for an hour. Collect the liquid from your mixture into a bottle. You’ll notice that the liquid is now dark blue or purple at which point is neutral. It is ready to be used as an indicator. ...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Understand how metals react in hydrochloric acid

In this video tutorial the instructor talks about Hydrochloric acid (HCL) and how it reacts to a few metals. To try this out take 30 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid in a beaker. You need to employ caution while handling acids, especially if you use strong ones. Now you can throw small pieces of different metals into it carefully to see how it reacts with different metals. For instance when this HCL comes in contact with metals various reaction take place depending up on the metal. Like i...

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