How To: Reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces

In this tutorial, we learn how to reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces. The item you will need to do this is crystal iodine and plastic sheeting to protect your work surface. Place your specimen into a plastic container with the iodine, then put the top on and let sit, placing your hand under to warm it up. Within a few minutes you will see a violet color vaporizing in the container. When finished, you will be able to take out your specimen and see the fingerprints that are al...

How To: Draw the Lewis structure for ammonia

In this how-to video, you will learn how to make the Lewis structure for Ammonia. The formula for Ammonia is NH3. Now, write down H, N, and H in a horizontal line. Place an H under the N. Place two dots in between the spaces found in the H's and the N. Also place two dots above the N. Since the valance electrons are balanced, draw a line between the two dots connecting the H to the N. Leave the two dots above the N alone. This video shows just how easy it is to create a Lewis structure for Am...

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Construct a vinegar battery and power a calculator

Using only vinegar and a few simple materials, it is possible to construct a working battery. This science video tutorial explains how to construct and use a battery like this to power a calculator. A good science project as part of an introductory electricity course. This project can be used as a science fair project or merely for fun. If you've ever wanted to make your own battery, know is the time, this science experiment will show you how.

How To: Build a potato battery

Like a lemon, a potato can produce electricity. This science experiment was prepared by Ebtisam Al Anzoor and demonstrated by Mustafa Daif. The electricity is proven using an analog micro ameter. The positive is copper from a penny or copper coin while the negative is a galavanized nail. The potato releases a charge and is further proven when it is connected to a calculator. You can daisy chain the potatoes for a greater charge.

News: Colloidal Display Turns Soapy Bubbles into a Transparent 3D Projection Screen

We've all played with bubbles as kids, but I think most would agree that they're not exactly the most functional of objects. An international team of researchers made up of Yoichi Ochiai, Alexis Oyama and Keisuke Toyoshima wants to change that. They've figured out how to project both 2D and 3D images onto a micro membrane (soap bubble) using ultrasonic sound waves and a standard projector. The bubble is made of a solution of sugar, glycerin, soap, surfactant, water and milk. The glycerin and ...

How to Be Your Own SpaceX: Design, Build & Test Liquid-Fueled Rocket Engines

Move over NASA— SpaceX is taking over. Well, not really. But today, the privately funded spacecraft company broke all expectations when their Dragon capsule fell to a soft landing in the Pacific Ocean, completing an undoubtedly successful demo flight of nearly two full trips around Earth. It was the first re-entry of a commercial spacecraft ever, bringing commercial space transportation closer to reality.

How To: Make a permanent, reusable glow stick

Make a reusable glow stick, glow-in-the-dark-style! Imagine, you'll never have to buy one of those ChemLite's again, because you can reuse this homemade glow stick over and over again. This video tutorial will show you how to make a permanent, reusable glow stick. The materials in this experiment are simple: epoxy resin, straw, and some phosphor powder.

How To: Light candles with a microwave oven

Say you're hosting a birthday party and the birthday girl's cake needs to be lit up, but you've just run out of matches. What to do? While you can certainly go to the store and purchase more, doing so would take at least half an hour (an eternity to wait for little kids), it's probably easier to make a flame with what you've got at home.

How To: Make elemental sulfur (sulphur)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make elemental sulfur (sulphur). The chemicals you need are nitric acid and sodium thiosulphate. The reaction produces toxic SO2 gas so keep it coved with a watch glass. Put 12.9 grams of sodium thiosulphate in a beaker and dissolve it in minimum amount of water. Pour about 15ml of nitric acid in to the beaker. Let it sit in a warm place for a couple of hours and the sulphur will settle at the bottom of the beaker. Th...

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