Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Make Trippy Triboluminescent Crystals That Glow Red or Blue When You Smash Them

If you're a Breaking Bad junkie who can't wait for the next episode, satisfy your craving with a little at-home chemistry and make some blue DIY smash-glow crystals! No, this is not Walter White's so-called "Big Sky" or even the subpar cringe-worthy product of his competitors. It's not even the same kind of crystals, otherwise you wouldn't be reading this. This is totally legal, even kid-friendly if you play it safe, though it actually requires more safety precautions than the potassium nitra...

How To: Hollow out a penny

In this video, we learn how to hollow out a penny. First, you need pennies that are dated after 1982, muriatic acid, a plastic container, and sandpaper. First, rub the edge of the penny on sandpaper until the silver color is exposed. Do this on two pennies, then place them in the plastic container. Now, while wearing gloves, pour the acid into the container so the pennies are completely covered. Now the pennies will start to bubble, leaves these in the acid for around six hours. Next, pour th...

How To: Crush a soda can with heat and cold water

Want to find out how you can squash a can of Coke with a little science? Just watch this video tutorial to see how to crush a soda can with heat and cold water. You will need to get an empty can of Coke (or Pepsi if you prefer) with a little water inside, something to hold the soon-to-be-hot can with, a bowl, ice, water and salt. You can impress your friends with this trick, all without using your own force... a little chemical and temperature change goes a long way.

How To: Do the Kaye effect science experiment

Check out how to demonstrate the Kaye effect using shampoo and lanyard with this tutorial. On dribbling shampoo from a small height above a pool of the same shampoo below, every now and then liquid lanyards of shampoo leap forth in a behavior referred to as the Kaye effect. Such behavior is characteristic of a viscoelastic fluid. This is a great science experiment to do with your kids. Watch this how to video and you will be able to create the Kaye effect at home.

News: Bored? Get High Now (Using Your Computer)

For some of you out there, today may be a looooong Friday. But have no fear, if you've yet to furtively accomplish shaving off a few extra minutes from the office clock, there is an alternative for getting through the day: computer pharmaceuticals. Relax, moms, we're not talking illicit drugs. Computer pharmaceuticals (AKA: optical and audio illusions) are completely natural, harmless highs that promise to alter your perception and consciousness- without the risk of drugs or alcohol.

How To: Synthesize copper(II) carbonate & sodium bicarbonate

This actions is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to synthesize copper(II) carbonate & sodium bicarbonate. For this you will need copper sulphate which is available in root kill and sodium bicarb which is baking soda. Take 100g of copper sulphate and dissolve in about 400ml of water. Now take 69.27g of baking soda. Add baking soda very slowly and keep stirring the solution. You got to be very careful as the chemical reaction will produce lot of carbon...

How To: Make a pH indicator out of red cabbage

In this video, we learn how to make a pH indicator out of red cabbage. Red cabbage will work because when it absorbs an acid then it changes color and reflects light differently. To do this at home, try to add different types of acids to the cabbage. Start off by putting the cabbage in the blender, then make sure it's shredded. Now, put it in a jar with some boiling hot water. Shake up the jar, then place the water into some separate cups. Now, add chemicals into the juice and depending on th...

How To: Light an energy saving bulb without plugging it

This video shows the viewer how to light an energy saving light bulb without plugging it in. The process is also explained in detail during the video. To light the bulb you need to inflate a standard balloon. Then rub the balloon over either a fabric or your hair. Then move the balloon back and forth near the light bulb. The bulb should glow dimly. This effect occurs because the balloon is negatively charged. This means that it has more electrons than protons. The video then goes on to explai...

How To: Make duct tape glow

If there was a way to make duct tape more desirable and distinct, would you do it? Well, what if there was a way to make duct tape glow? There is a way. Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make duct tape glow with Dr. Lithium.

How To: Show the Leidenfrost Effect (Hand vs. Liquid Nitrogen)

What would happen if you stick your hand in a pool of liquid nitrogen? Would your hand freeze to death? Would it harden to an unnatural state? Would it shatter as soon as you touched something? Well, real life isn't like the movies (i.e. Demolition Man), so believe it or not, your hand would be safe, thanks to a little known phenomenon called the Leidenfrost effect.

How To: Dissect a human to see the superficial layers of skin

Before you start dissecting the body of a human being, there are a few things you should probably learn first. This anatomical look at the human body will give you just what you need to delve into your human dissection. Just watch this video tutorial on a few bony landmarks you should be aware of by palpating, like the clavicles, the sternum and sternal notch, the rib cage, and the pelvic region.

How To: Use baby powder to reveal latent fingerprints

This short video shows us how to reveal latent fingerprints on a glass surface by dusting. Anyone interested in forensic science would enjoy trying it as it shows simple steps in dusting and lifting fingerprints. It does not require any chemicals and we can do it with baby powder. The steps involved are so simple and easy to follow that even kids can try it out for fun. This gives a clear idea about fingerprints on different objects like porous, non porous and metals. Enjoy viewing and detect...

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Make boric acid from borax

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to make boric acid from borax. For this experiment you will need borax (disodium tetra borate) and conc. hydrochloric acid. Take 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and dilute it with 75 ml of water. Next take 6 - 7 gms of borax and dissolve it in boiling water. Now add equal amount of hydrochloric acid. Crystals of boric acid will start forming. They are completely insoluble in cold water. After about half an hour, fi...

How To: Use superglue to reveal latent fingerprints

Do you need to check a scene for prints, or are maybe just curious about the techniques of forensic science? In this video, Robert Bruce Thompson from the Home Scientist unravels the mysterious of forensic fingerprinting using common materials that you may already have sitting around in your home right now. Explains and demonstrates the process of superglue fuming step-by-step to reveal latent fingerprints. Includes great tips on how to improve and speed up the process using household products.

News: Dissecting a Human Head Through Anatomical Illustrations

Human anatomy is something every physician must undergo as a medical student. Some move on to become great doctors, some move on to become great artists, helping to better educate students and improve upon many illustrated representations of the human body since the days of medieval medicine. But thankfully, you don't have to be in the medical profession to enjoy the beautiful art of the human body created for teaching purposes.

How To: Analyze cheap sulfuric acid for concentration & purity

In this home scientist video the instructor Robert Bruce talks about cheap sulfuric acid. He says that sulfuric acid is very important in any lab both as a reagent and a precursor for preparing other chemicals. He points to the battery acid saying that it is a good source of sulfuric acid which is 35% concentrated. Now he shows various methods to obtained sulfuric acid and shows how to test one of the thus obtained sulfuric acid for its concentration. In this video the author talks about sulf...

How To: Reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces

In this tutorial, we learn how to reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces. The item you will need to do this is crystal iodine and plastic sheeting to protect your work surface. Place your specimen into a plastic container with the iodine, then put the top on and let sit, placing your hand under to warm it up. Within a few minutes you will see a violet color vaporizing in the container. When finished, you will be able to take out your specimen and see the fingerprints that are al...

How To: Make your own thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates

The price of TLC plates can add up. See how to make thin-layer chromatography plates (TLC plates) for a few cents each that are as good as commercial TLC plates that sell for a dollar or two each. You can use these home-made TLC plates the same way you'd use chromatography paper, but the plates provide sharper separations and require far less analyte. They also lie flat, and are much easier to store for later reference. For more information, including step-by-step instructions, and to get sta...

How To: Build a catapult out of rubber bands & a wire hanger

In this tutorial, we learn how to build a catapult out of rubber bands & a wire hanger. To do this, you will first need: one wire hanger, plastic spoon, rubber bands, small marshmallows, and measuring tape. Now, hold your hand in the center of the hanger and pull up both sides around it. After this, fold back the front for balance and straighten it up so it's stable. Next, you will take one rubber band and put it around the sides. Then, take the spoon and put it in between the rubber band and...

How To: There's Metal Hiding in Your Pepto-Bismol and Here's How You Extract It

Got an upset stomach or a little heartburn? America's favorite pink pill will cure it right up. But did you know that there's actually metal hiding in those chewable Pepto-Bismol tablets? Yes, metal. Technically, it's a poor metal, but metal's metal, right? Well, we do tend to eat a lot of iron in our diets, because it carries oxygen throughout our bodies, so consuming metallic minerals isn't anything abnormal. But you'd never think that Pepto-Bismol is actually made up of metal.

How To: Perform a cool water heat conduction experiment

This is a cool science experiment to show what a great heat conductor water is. You'll need some balloons, a candle and some water. Check it out and be amazed! Common sense tells you that it's impossible to boil water in a paper bag, but this classic parlor trick was a favorite of the Victorian magician. The real difficultly in performing this effect is making it look harder than it is! As you might imagine, the secret lies in yet another amazing property of water - it's ability to conduct he...

How To: Make iodine easily

In this video, we learn how to make iodine easily. You will need potassium iodine and sulfuric acid to make this. First, add the acid into the potassium iodine slowly. After you add in each part, swirl the beaker slowly so it gets mixed together. After you have added in all of the potassium, you will place this into a beaker filled with ice water while you add in more, because the mixture gets really hot. When finished, you will end up with a mixture that is iodine and nothing else. Fill with...

How To: Do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces with different types of food. Yeast is a fungus and it has to eat. After it eats, it produces CO2 gas. The bubbles in bread are produced by the CO2 gas from the yeast. Take five different types of food items and measure out the same quantity for each item. In the video it is 8gms of cookie, oil, flour, salt and sugar. Take six glasses of water and mix one packet of yeast in each glass....