Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Focus your laser to make it burn

In this video, we learn how to focus your laser to make it burn. The best spot for a laser to burn things is at its focal point. This is where the beam from the laser is at its smallest. If you hold a match in front of the beam, it will light it on fire as soon as it's in front of it. If you put two lasers next to each other going the same direction, it won't be able to burn because the light beam is too large. If you position the lasers so the light is smaller, then they can catch something ...

How To: Use gentian violet to reveal latent fingerprints

This video would be very interesting for those seeking careers or those interested in the field of criminal science. This field involves forensic science. The video explains to us how to use gentian violet in order reveal latent fingerprints. He explains to us the experiment he is about to do before he does it. Genetian violet is a type of dye solution that can be very helpful in retrieving fingerprints. Safety goggles and gloves should be worn at all times.

How To: Build a real lava lamp

This is how to make a near professional grade lava lamp. We did this as a chemistry project. We perfected it in a week. This took many hours to do, as we had to get the density just right. We remade it three times, also. At the very end, we combined all of the wax into a huge flask. And then it blew up.

How To: Observe the Full Moons in 2011 (Lunar Calendar)

When's the next full moon? Every time I've looked at the moon, I've wondered if it was full. Sometimes it looked like it was, but it's really hard to tell for sure unless you know the exact date of the full moon. Seriously, there's at a couple days before and after the full moon that could easily pass as full. At least, to someone like me who isn't naturally in tune with the moon's cycle (and doesn't have perfect vision).

How To: Make iodine easily

In this video, we learn how to make iodine easily. You will need potassium iodine and sulfuric acid to make this. First, add the acid into the potassium iodine slowly. After you add in each part, swirl the beaker slowly so it gets mixed together. After you have added in all of the potassium, you will place this into a beaker filled with ice water while you add in more, because the mixture gets really hot. When finished, you will end up with a mixture that is iodine and nothing else. Fill with...

How To: Make verdigris with copper and vinegar

In this tutorial, we learn how to make verdigris with copper and vinegar. Verdigris is a compound of copper that is blue and powder. You will need: copper metal, vinegar, a big jug, and a small beaker. Now, place the small beaker inside of the jar, then fill the bottom with vinegar. Next, put the piece of copper metal inside of the jar making sure it sits inside the small beaker. Seal this and put it in a safe and dry place. Leave it for a good month, then when you come back you will have a n...

How To: Use a protractor to measure the height of any object

In this video, we learn how to use a protractor to measure the height of any object. First, attach a level to the protractor, followed by a straw at the 45 degree angle. Next, walk back form the object while looking through the straw. Keep walking back until you spot the top of the object through the straw, then measure to the base of the object. After this, you will have an isosceles triangle that has two equal sides. Use these sides to help find what the size of the object is. After this, a...

How To: Find the volume of a sphere

In this video the author show how to find the volume of a sphere. The formula for finding the volume of a sphere is 4/3 * Pi * r*r*r, where r is the radius of the sphere. Now to compute the volume of a sphere you have to note down the radius of the sphere and substitute it in the above formula along with the other substitutions. The author shows this with an example by taking a sphere of some radius and calculating its volume. To find out how to calculate the volume of a sphere watch this vid...

News: Zooming Into Sand

Incredible. There's a type of sand (found only on the small Okinawan island of Iriomote) in which each grain resembles a tiny star. And I never would have known, if it hadn't been for blogger Jason Kottke's pal Mouser. Mouser collects sand from all around the world, and then documents each sample with a macro lens:

How To: Make bubbling acid with ammonia and dry ice

In the mood for a little mad science? In this home-science how-to from Steve Spangler, we learn how to prepare a bubbly, color-changing concoction using water, ammonia, a universal indicator (cabbage juice will do fine), dry ice, gloves and two plastic cups. Now, repeat the process, this time adding a teaspoon of ammonia when you add your universal pH indicator.

How To: Make maganese heptoxide (permanganic acid)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make manganese heptoxide (permanganic acid). This procedure is extremely dangerous. Manganese heptoxide is an extremely powerful oxidizing agent. It has the ability to set fuels on fire from mere contact. Get an old dish and put a spatula full of potassium permanganate on it. Add a few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid. A green liquid is formed which is the manganese heptoxide. Now you can add any fuel like butanol...

How To: Get a coin out of water without getting wet

In this tutorial, we learn how to get a coin out of water without getting wet. First, place the coin inside of water on a plate. Next, use a lighter to light a piece of paper on fire, then place the paper inside the water cup and let it smoke and burn. Next, push the cup down onto the plate, and it will soak up all the water that was on the plate! Then, your penny will be dry and you can pick it up without getting wet! This is a great trick to show your friends and works easily without any pr...

How To: Read a vernier caliper

A vernier caliper is a great tool to use if you're interested in measuring things externally, internally, and in some cases the depth. It gives you a precise measurement and includes both metric and inch measurements on the upper and lower part of the scale. It's an easy tool to use and can be helpful in certain situations. So sit back and enjoy this tutorial on how to read a vernier caliper. Enjoy!

How To: Perform hot filtration in the chemistry lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Bend a carrot

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to bend a carrot. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity using common vegetables. Learn how to bend a carrot by watching the step by step instructions outlined in this science tutorial video.

How To: Ignite a Brillo pad

Check out this instructional science video to learn how to make a steel wool soap pad ignite. Using a 9v battery, touch the Brillo pad to make the steel wool ignite. This is a simple science experiment following step by step the instructions in this video tutorial, trying out for yourself. This is a great experiment to perform with the kids.

How To: Make sense of a sheep's brain

Do you like biology class? Do you like dissecting things? Well, this is the video tutorial for you. Check out this three-part anatomy of a sheep's brain educational video to know everything you need to know about the thoughts of a lamb. You'll get all of the names associated with the sheep brain, but don't think you'll remember them in one sitting, there's too much for even the über-science nerd.