Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Make H2O and CO2

Baking soda and vinegar chemical reaction that results in H2O and CO2. More demonstration than instruction, this video does show you the grade school experiment of putting vinegar and baking soda together. Make H2O and CO2.

How To: Make crystal iodine

MAKE brings the do-it-yourself mindset to all the technology in your life. Make Magazine celebrates your right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your own will. In this tutorial, Robert Bruce Thompson shows you how to make crystal iodine. As Thompson says in the video, crystal iodine is currently a schedule one compound, and in order to buy you have to fill out a lot of paperwork and you'll end up on a DEA list. This tutorial gets you around that, but proceed carefully.

How To: Make elemental sulfur (sulphur)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make elemental sulfur (sulphur). The chemicals you need are nitric acid and sodium thiosulphate. The reaction produces toxic SO2 gas so keep it coved with a watch glass. Put 12.9 grams of sodium thiosulphate in a beaker and dissolve it in minimum amount of water. Pour about 15ml of nitric acid in to the beaker. Let it sit in a warm place for a couple of hours and the sulphur will settle at the bottom of the beaker. Th...

How To: Use vinegar & hydrogen peroxide to reveal fingerprints

Learn how to find latent finger prints on brass surfaces, such as fired cartridge cases. Called the Acidified Peroxide method, using only white distilled vinegar and hydrogen peroxide that you can find at your local drugstore, you can uncover fingerprints that is usually impossible to see using other methods. After mixing the vinegar and hydrogen peroxide the solution should start turning a greenish color around the brass object after 5 to 10 minutes. After you see the green color throw away ...

How To: Make a storm inside a test tube

This science experiment will show you how to make a storm inside a test tube. This video tutorial will demonstrate the process of making the miniature thunderstorm inside a test tube with just a few common chemicals. All you need for your very own thunder storm is a glass test tube with holder, sulfuric acid, ethyl alcohol (ethanol), potassium permanganate, glass dropper, measuring spoon, and please wear safety goggles. Sparks and pops occur completely random, just like in a real thunderstorm!

How To: Dissect a chicken wing

You've gotten enough satisfaction from gorging on fried chicken wings, so now it's time to learn the science of them. And not—we're not talking why they taste so freaking good, but how they work, pre-fried food. We're talking anatomy class, and if you can eat a piece of chicken, then you surely can dissect a chicken leg for educational reasons. Watch this video to learn about the chicken's triceps and bicep muscles, as well as what happens when the biceps and triceps contract.

How To: Use a Dean Stark apparatus in the chemistry lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Dissect a human to see the superficial layers of skin

Before you start dissecting the body of a human being, there are a few things you should probably learn first. This anatomical look at the human body will give you just what you need to delve into your human dissection. Just watch this video tutorial on a few bony landmarks you should be aware of by palpating, like the clavicles, the sternum and sternal notch, the rib cage, and the pelvic region.

How To: Make hydrogen gas & an explosion

First you need to make hydrogen gas which require a few material. Such as a glass bottle, a Full table spoon of aluminum (beer or soda can will work), a half a cup of cold water, a table spoon or two of caustic soda, a funnel, a medium size container of water, a way of cutting the aluminum, one or two balloon's, and some safety glasses just incase something goes wrong.

How To: Make nitrogen triiodide

Learn how to make nitrogen triiodide (NI3), the main ingredient of the small, paper-covered parcels that you throw at the ground to make a snapping noise, with household chemicals and items. This chemical is very unstable, so please exercise caution.

How To: Make a cloud, then make it disappear

This video features a really cool science experiment that is easy to do and fun to watch. Items you will need are a plastic 2-liter bottle with a sports bottle type cap (the kind you pull up on in order to sip liquids through the top), about a quarter of a cup of water and two matches. First, take the cap off the bottle and pour the water into the bottle before putting the cap back on the bottle. Then, simply open the pull top on the cap (so that when the bottle is squeezed and released air i...

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

How To: Make (non-Newtonian) Oobleck from corn starch & water

Mr. O shows his audience in this video how to make oobleck, a slime-like substance which has a variety of unique properties. For this project, you will need a mixing bowl, food coloring, corn starch, a measuring cup, and water. First, color the water with food coloring to a color which is much darker than the color you would like. You will need the correct ratio of water to cornstarch, in a 1 to 2 ratio. Add some water to the bowl and add the cornstarch, then add the rest of the water. Finall...