Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Light candles with a microwave oven

Say you're hosting a birthday party and the birthday girl's cake needs to be lit up, but you've just run out of matches. What to do? While you can certainly go to the store and purchase more, doing so would take at least half an hour (an eternity to wait for little kids), it's probably easier to make a flame with what you've got at home.

How To: Do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces with different types of food. Yeast is a fungus and it has to eat. After it eats, it produces CO2 gas. The bubbles in bread are produced by the CO2 gas from the yeast. Take five different types of food items and measure out the same quantity for each item. In the video it is 8gms of cookie, oil, flour, salt and sugar. Take six glasses of water and mix one packet of yeast in each glass....

How To: Build a real lava lamp

This is how to make a near professional grade lava lamp. We did this as a chemistry project. We perfected it in a week. This took many hours to do, as we had to get the density just right. We remade it three times, also. At the very end, we combined all of the wax into a huge flask. And then it blew up.

How To: There's Metal Hiding in Your Pepto-Bismol and Here's How You Extract It

Got an upset stomach or a little heartburn? America's favorite pink pill will cure it right up. But did you know that there's actually metal hiding in those chewable Pepto-Bismol tablets? Yes, metal. Technically, it's a poor metal, but metal's metal, right? Well, we do tend to eat a lot of iron in our diets, because it carries oxygen throughout our bodies, so consuming metallic minerals isn't anything abnormal. But you'd never think that Pepto-Bismol is actually made up of metal.

How To: Make (non-Newtonian) Oobleck from corn starch & water

Mr. O shows his audience in this video how to make oobleck, a slime-like substance which has a variety of unique properties. For this project, you will need a mixing bowl, food coloring, corn starch, a measuring cup, and water. First, color the water with food coloring to a color which is much darker than the color you would like. You will need the correct ratio of water to cornstarch, in a 1 to 2 ratio. Add some water to the bowl and add the cornstarch, then add the rest of the water. Finall...

How To: Explore Density, Viscosity & Miscibility with a Colorful Layered Liquid Science Experiment

Ever wonder why Jupiter has those colored bands across its surface? Jupiter's enormous mass is made from an array of different liquids, and those fluids do not play well together because of their different makeup. All of the hydrogen- and helium-based fluids are thought not to be miscible, which means that they aren't homogeneous in nature, resulting in strikingly beautiful bands across the planet's surface. But what about viscosity and how that correlates to the development of planets? What ...

How To: Turn a penny into gold with common chemicals

This science experiment will show you how to turn a penny into gold with common chemicals. This video tutorial will demonstrate turning the copper penny into a silver penny and into a gold cent. All you need to make gold pennies is sodium hydroxide (also known as lye), zinc powder, a small glass beaker with some distilled water in it, a clean copper penny, a couple of measuring spoons, and a glass stirring rod.

How To: Get a coin out of water without getting wet

In this tutorial, we learn how to get a coin out of water without getting wet. First, place the coin inside of water on a plate. Next, use a lighter to light a piece of paper on fire, then place the paper inside the water cup and let it smoke and burn. Next, push the cup down onto the plate, and it will soak up all the water that was on the plate! Then, your penny will be dry and you can pick it up without getting wet! This is a great trick to show your friends and works easily without any pr...

How To: Revive a drowned fly

Ever wished you were Jesus? This how-to video can bestow you with life-reviving powers. It's not a trick. See how you can revive a seemingly drowned fly with salt by watching this educational and instructional video. Let the resurrection begin.

How To: Make glow sticks with DEP, TCPO, sodium acetate & dye

If you prefer glow sticks over candles during a power outage, then this how-to is for you! Although glow sticks are used as temporary light sources, there are other applications for them. Divers use them for night diving, fisherman use them to catch swordfish, and the military uses them for light markers, along with infrared versions used in conjunction with night vision devices. But with all these handy uses for glow sticks, the most popular is — recreational use, like dancing at raves, some...

How To: Do a flaming ice experiment

In this fascinating "how to" video, you will see how a simple process creates the illusion of ice that is burning. Only a few items are needed to enact this scientific experiment. As the narrator describes, "Calcium carbide reacts with water to form acetylene gas." To illustrate, the video shows a bowl of ice cubes, to which the special ingredient is added. As the ice melts into water, it reacts with the calcium carbide, forming the high flammable acetylene gas, which is often used in welding...

How To: Make TCPO (for making glow sticks)

How to make TCPO or bis(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) oxalate, used in glow stick reactions. WARNING: This procedure should only be performed by, or under the direct supervision of, an experienced chemist. Please refer to the material safety data sheets of all chemicals for their hazards. Synthesis must be performed in a fumehood.

DIY Plastination: Turning Dead Animals Into Science-Jerky

If you found the world renown Body Worlds exhibition gnarly and perverse, perhaps you'll find this latest parade of plastination a little less so—considering we don't share the same DNA as these specimens of jerky-in-the-name-of-science. The Koerperwelten der Tiere—or Animal Body Worlds–doesn't showcase preserved corporal matter, but rather 20 odd plastinated mammals, currently on display at the Cologne Zoo in Cologne, Germany.

How To: Turn eggs into bouncing balls

In this tutorial, we learn how to turn eggs into bouncing balls. You will need: hard boiled eggs, vinegar, and a jar to make these. First, fill your jar up with vinegar and then drop your egg inside of it. After this, let the egg sit inside of the jar for a couple of days. After this, take the egg out and peel the membrane of off the outside of it. Now, you will be able to use your egg to bounce off of anything. When peeled apart, the contents of the egg will be rubbery as well! This is an in...

How To: Understand resonant frequencies

In this video tutorial the instructor demonstrates resonant frequency. In this video the instructor shows the sound of resonance and how to generate it. Resonance is a forced vibration of energy into molecules of an object that makes those molecules vibrate at their resonant frequency. When these molecules vibrate naturally they produce a kind of noise that can be annoying some times. In this video the author makes a small object using a rubber band and a net that produces vibrations when rot...

How To: Balance a chemical equation step-by-step

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to balance a chemical equation step-by-step. The left side of the equation is called the reactants and the right side is the new products. What will be new products when silver nitrate reacts with ferric chloride? The left side will be written as Ag NO3 + Fe Cl. The valence of Ag is +1, NO3 is -1, Fe is +3 and Cl is -1. On the right side the silver cannot go with iron because both are positive. So, it will be ...

How To: Understand polyatomic chemical formulas

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to understand polyatomic chemical formulas. When writing the formula using polyatomics, the same cross-over rule applies. 1st identify the metal and non-metal. Then you write the symbols, write the charges, cross-over the charges from top to bottom, remove the charge and simplify the numbers and remove the 1s. for example, iron (II) phospahate. The "ate" ending implies that phosphate is polyatomic. The symbol ...

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How To: Use a Peltier module to create free electricity from heat

A Peltier module allows you to turn heat into electricity. Because you can place it in areas that are normally warm anyway, the electricity created is "free" in a sense, though it does work best when one side of the module is cold and the other is hot. In other words, all you'll need for this project is the Peltier module and a cooler surface such as soil or water, and a warm area such as a well lit window or warm pan.