Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces

In this tutorial, we learn how to reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces. The item you will need to do this is crystal iodine and plastic sheeting to protect your work surface. Place your specimen into a plastic container with the iodine, then put the top on and let sit, placing your hand under to warm it up. Within a few minutes you will see a violet color vaporizing in the container. When finished, you will be able to take out your specimen and see the fingerprints that are al...

How To: Understand how metals react in hydrochloric acid

In this video tutorial the instructor talks about Hydrochloric acid (HCL) and how it reacts to a few metals. To try this out take 30 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid in a beaker. You need to employ caution while handling acids, especially if you use strong ones. Now you can throw small pieces of different metals into it carefully to see how it reacts with different metals. For instance when this HCL comes in contact with metals various reaction take place depending up on the metal. Like i...

News: Build Your Own Oscillating Wave Machine

Transverse wave motion is the beautiful rippling effect that occurs when a moving wave causes oscillations that travel perpendicular to the direction of energy transferred. (For example, via Wikipedia: "If a transverse wave is moving in the positive x-direction, its oscillations are in up and down directions that lie in the y–z plane.")

How To: Shrink plastic with household materials

In this video, we learn how to shrink plastic with household materials. You will need: tin foil, plastic container, scissors, glove, and colored markers. To start, you will preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Then, cut a piece of the plastic out in a square shape. Next, draw whatever you want onto your piece of plastic. Make it as colorful as you would like to! When finished, put this in the oven using a glove. Make sure it's on the foil when you put it in. Then, leave it in for less than a minu...

How To: Do a sodium and water experiment

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to do a sodium and water experiment. Sodium is a silver metal that is very reactive. When exposed oxygen in the air, an outer coding of sodium oxide will form. Simply drop a piece of sodium into a cup of water. When dropped in water, sodium reacts to form sodium hydroxide and hydrogen gas. The sodium will constant move around in the water. Sometimes the heated reaction will cause the nitrogen gas to ignite. Under the right condition, it may even cause...

How To: Explore Density, Viscosity & Miscibility with a Colorful Layered Liquid Science Experiment

Ever wonder why Jupiter has those colored bands across its surface? Jupiter's enormous mass is made from an array of different liquids, and those fluids do not play well together because of their different makeup. All of the hydrogen- and helium-based fluids are thought not to be miscible, which means that they aren't homogeneous in nature, resulting in strikingly beautiful bands across the planet's surface. But what about viscosity and how that correlates to the development of planets? What ...

How To: Make a light bulb from a pickle

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to make a light bulb from a pickle. Pickles are high in ions in the form of acids and salts. These are electrolytes and they will transfer energy through the pickle. Place a pickle on a glass plate and hook it up with an AC power cord with a nail on each end as shown in the video. You must have protective gloves on. Poke the nails on each end of the pickle and hook up the cord to the power source. The pickle will start emitting light which i...

How To: Make verdigris with copper and vinegar

In this tutorial, we learn how to make verdigris with copper and vinegar. Verdigris is a compound of copper that is blue and powder. You will need: copper metal, vinegar, a big jug, and a small beaker. Now, place the small beaker inside of the jar, then fill the bottom with vinegar. Next, put the piece of copper metal inside of the jar making sure it sits inside the small beaker. Seal this and put it in a safe and dry place. Leave it for a good month, then when you come back you will have a n...

How To: Make aluminum nitrate nonahydrate

Aluminum nitrate nonahydrate is a crystalline hydrate - a salt of aluminum and nitric acid - Al(NO3)3·9H2O. It's used for a variety of things such as antiperspirants, corrosion inhibitors, and petroleum refining, or… glow-in-the-dark powder. Watch this science video tutorial from Nurd Rage on how to make aluminum nitrate nonahydrate with Dr. Lithium.

How To: Make an electro-magnet with only three things

An electromagnet is a fun, cool science experiment that you can easily make at home. In this tutorial, learn how to make a powerful electromagnet with only three pieces! And the best part is, you probably already have these items in your house or garage! So, why not gather some supplies and try making an electromagnet? You will definitely impress your class and friends.

How To: Build a wind turbine with PVC windmill blades

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to build a wind turbine with PVC windmill blades. This project when completed will charge a 12V battery. You can turn a motor in to a generator. When you spin the shaft on the generator, electricity is generated. So you get a motor with a flywheel and attach the turbine blades to it. When the blades turn with wind action, electricity will be generated. Take PVC pipes, 8" in diameter and 24" long. Cut the blades out of the pipe as per directi...

How To: Calculate your carbon footprint

Watch this video tutorial to learn how to calculate your carbon footprint. A carbon footprint is an equation that estimates just how much you, personally, are contributing to global warming—and all you have to do is plug some info into an online calculator. Figuring out how to make your footprint smaller, of course, is another matter.

How To: Carry out a titration in the lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Make "hot ice"

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to make "hot ice". Users will need sodium acetate. Begin by putting the sodium acetate into a pan. Add a small amount water to the sodium acetate. Heat the mixture on a stove until the sodium acetate has dissolved. Pour the solution into a container. Do not pour in any undissolved crystals. Put the container into the freezer or refrigerator for a while. When the solution cools down to room temperature, take it out. Touch the sodium acetate and it will...

News: Creepy Facial Reconstruction of Iceman Mummy

It's tough to figure out what a mummy would have looked like when he was alive; soft tissue of a human body decays, even in ice. But, Dutch brothers Adrie and Alfons Kennis took the challenge. Using techniques that belong to both science and art, they managed to reconstruct the face and body of Otzi the Iceman, a mummy who was found in the Italian Alps in 1991.

How To: Make a wax and Coke explosion

Watch what happens when Coke is mixed with wax. Learn how to do this cool science experiment yourself. Can anyone explain the science behind this??? You will need Coke (diet or regular), a glass test tube, and a candle. Break off a chunk of wax from the candle, put it in the test tube, heat the test tube until the wax is boiling and then quickly add to the coke.

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

Glow sticks, a popular favor at parties and outdoor events, and a must-have on Halloween, can be traced back to the United States Navy in the mid-1960s. The military desired improved visibility during night operations, and glow sticks, with their small-size portability and lack of batteries, were a perfect tactical solution.

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...