Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

News: Dissecting a Human Head Through Anatomical Illustrations

Human anatomy is something every physician must undergo as a medical student. Some move on to become great doctors, some move on to become great artists, helping to better educate students and improve upon many illustrated representations of the human body since the days of medieval medicine. But thankfully, you don't have to be in the medical profession to enjoy the beautiful art of the human body created for teaching purposes.

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...

How To: Revive a drowned fly

Ever wished you were Jesus? This how-to video can bestow you with life-reviving powers. It's not a trick. See how you can revive a seemingly drowned fly with salt by watching this educational and instructional video. Let the resurrection begin.

How To: Make hot ice using Sodium Acetate Trihydrate

This video in the Education category will show you how to make hot ice using Sodium Acetate Trihydrate. For this purpose you will need a pan, 100g of Sodium Acetate Trihydrate, 25ml of water, a wooden spoon and a glass. Take the Sodium Acetate Trihydrate and put 100g in the pan. Then place the pan on a stove and turn to medium heat. The Sodium Acetate Trihydrate will start to melt. In about five minutes when it has melted fully, add 25ml of water. Let the solution simmer for two minutes while...

How To: There's Metal Hiding in Your Pepto-Bismol and Here's How You Extract It

Got an upset stomach or a little heartburn? America's favorite pink pill will cure it right up. But did you know that there's actually metal hiding in those chewable Pepto-Bismol tablets? Yes, metal. Technically, it's a poor metal, but metal's metal, right? Well, we do tend to eat a lot of iron in our diets, because it carries oxygen throughout our bodies, so consuming metallic minerals isn't anything abnormal. But you'd never think that Pepto-Bismol is actually made up of metal.

How To: Draw the Lewis dot structure for sulfate

TTUchme1010 teaches viewers how to draw the lewis dot structure for sulfate. The formula for this is SO4^2-. 2- means we will have to add 2 electrons into the lewis dot structure. First, we will have Sulfur in the middle with Oxygen surrounding it. Sulfur is in group 6A so it have 6 valence electrons and oxygen has six, so fill this all in around the elements. Now, you have to add in the 2 extra electrons onto the most electronegative atom. This will be oxygen. Now, you should start bonding t...

How To: Rip a Penny in Half

No, we're not lying. But before you try and tear a plain old penny in half, you should probably watch this video first or you may hurt your fingers. While ordinary pennies are very, very difficult to rip, if you get rid of the zinc core you are left with only the thin copper shell, which is itself very easy to tear apart.

How To: Shrink plastic with household materials

In this video, we learn how to shrink plastic with household materials. You will need: tin foil, plastic container, scissors, glove, and colored markers. To start, you will preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Then, cut a piece of the plastic out in a square shape. Next, draw whatever you want onto your piece of plastic. Make it as colorful as you would like to! When finished, put this in the oven using a glove. Make sure it's on the foil when you put it in. Then, leave it in for less than a minu...

How To: Explore Density, Viscosity & Miscibility with a Colorful Layered Liquid Science Experiment

Ever wonder why Jupiter has those colored bands across its surface? Jupiter's enormous mass is made from an array of different liquids, and those fluids do not play well together because of their different makeup. All of the hydrogen- and helium-based fluids are thought not to be miscible, which means that they aren't homogeneous in nature, resulting in strikingly beautiful bands across the planet's surface. But what about viscosity and how that correlates to the development of planets? What ...

How To: Make maganese heptoxide (permanganic acid)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make manganese heptoxide (permanganic acid). This procedure is extremely dangerous. Manganese heptoxide is an extremely powerful oxidizing agent. It has the ability to set fuels on fire from mere contact. Get an old dish and put a spatula full of potassium permanganate on it. Add a few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid. A green liquid is formed which is the manganese heptoxide. Now you can add any fuel like butanol...

How To: Make bubbles from a CD

Mr. G teaches us how to make bubbles from a CD in this episode of "Do Try This at Home". You will need: a CD, screwdriver, and lighter or candle. Procedure: Use the screwdriver to scrape the aluminum coating from the CD until you get a clear plastic (polycarbonate). Heat an area underneath the CD slowly until the plastic is melted. Blow on the heated portion of the CD until you get a bubble. You may detach the bubble or leave the it on the CD. Heat and blow other portions of the CD to get new...

How To: Implode a soda can with heat

Check out this science experiment video to see how to implode a soda can with heat. That's right, implosion. Take an empty aluminum soda pop can and put a spoon of water into it. Heat it over the stovetop for about thirty seconds, then invert the can and dip it into a bowl of water. This is as simple as science gets, and easy to do, just be safe around the stove flame and don't burn yourself.

How To: Build a DIY electromagnet for cheap

This video shows the viewer how to make an electromagnet using common items. This is done using a broken microwave, a spool, a cordless drill, a battery and a coat hanger. The microwave transformer is dismantled and the enamel insulated wire is removed. Using the cordless drill the wire is then coiled around the spool. The iron coat hanger should then be cut into small pieces and placed in the middle of the spool. It should be secured tightly. The battery was then connected to the wired coile...

How To: Light an energy saving bulb without plugging it

This video shows the viewer how to light an energy saving light bulb without plugging it in. The process is also explained in detail during the video. To light the bulb you need to inflate a standard balloon. Then rub the balloon over either a fabric or your hair. Then move the balloon back and forth near the light bulb. The bulb should glow dimly. This effect occurs because the balloon is negatively charged. This means that it has more electrons than protons. The video then goes on to explai...

How To: Perform the "Lost Labels" science experiment

Check out this instructional science video that demonstrates how to perform the "Lost Labels" experiment. From the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry's teacher curriculum, "No Hassle Messy Science with a Wow", this is an activity about identifying mystery chemicals. You have an array of unknown powders in miscellaneous jars, and the idea is to try to have your students figure out what are all these mysterious white powders. Learn how to perform the Lost Labels science experiment by followi...

News: World's Simplest Electric Train

The trick in the video is that the magnets are made of a conducting material and they connect the battery terminals to the copper wire, so the battery, magnets and copper wire make a circuit that generates a magnet field just in the vicinity of the battery. The geometry means the two magnets are automatically at the ends of the generated magnetic field, where the field is divergent, so a force is exerted on the magnets.

How To: Take an acid and base to make salt

In this tutorial we learn how to take an acid and base to make salt. To start, you will first need to take an acid of your choice, this can be something like vinegar. After this, you will combine the acid with a base and then wait for it to react. Once it starts to react, gases will release from them and you will end up with some salt! Be sure to put a cap on the container while the reaction is happening. This will allow the reactions to come together and the gases to react. Have fun and do t...