Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Make elemental sulfur (sulphur)

This video tutorial is in the Education category which will show you how to make elemental sulfur (sulphur). The chemicals you need are nitric acid and sodium thiosulphate. The reaction produces toxic SO2 gas so keep it coved with a watch glass. Put 12.9 grams of sodium thiosulphate in a beaker and dissolve it in minimum amount of water. Pour about 15ml of nitric acid in to the beaker. Let it sit in a warm place for a couple of hours and the sulphur will settle at the bottom of the beaker. Th...

How To: Take an acid and base to make salt

In this tutorial we learn how to take an acid and base to make salt. To start, you will first need to take an acid of your choice, this can be something like vinegar. After this, you will combine the acid with a base and then wait for it to react. Once it starts to react, gases will release from them and you will end up with some salt! Be sure to put a cap on the container while the reaction is happening. This will allow the reactions to come together and the gases to react. Have fun and do t...

How To: Rip a Penny in Half

No, we're not lying. But before you try and tear a plain old penny in half, you should probably watch this video first or you may hurt your fingers. While ordinary pennies are very, very difficult to rip, if you get rid of the zinc core you are left with only the thin copper shell, which is itself very easy to tear apart.

News: Magnetic Powder Turns Silly Putty into Freakish Magnet-Hungry Blob

It's best known as a children's toy, but kids aren't the only ones who can appreciate the unique and marvelous properties of Silly Putty. It's an incredibly fun silicone polymer that almost seems like a scientific anomaly, thanks to its viscoelastic non-Newtonian flow. This amazing dilatant fluid can be stretched, torn and mashed back together, as well as bounce and shatter into pieces with a forceful blow.

How To: Do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces

In this Education video tutorial you will learn how to do a yeast experiment to see how much C02 it produces with different types of food. Yeast is a fungus and it has to eat. After it eats, it produces CO2 gas. The bubbles in bread are produced by the CO2 gas from the yeast. Take five different types of food items and measure out the same quantity for each item. In the video it is 8gms of cookie, oil, flour, salt and sugar. Take six glasses of water and mix one packet of yeast in each glass....

How To: Perform a cool water heat conduction experiment

This is a cool science experiment to show what a great heat conductor water is. You'll need some balloons, a candle and some water. Check it out and be amazed! Common sense tells you that it's impossible to boil water in a paper bag, but this classic parlor trick was a favorite of the Victorian magician. The real difficultly in performing this effect is making it look harder than it is! As you might imagine, the secret lies in yet another amazing property of water - it's ability to conduct he...

How To: Change the physical properties of yellow sulfur

In this tutorial, we learn how to change the physical properties of yellow sulfur. First, take a heat proof water glass and add in 1 teaspoon of sulfur powder. After this, heat the glass on a low flame for a few minutes. After this, the sulfur will start to melt and turn a reddish color. Now, pour the sulfur into some cold water after it's all the way melted and watch the reaction that is occurring. Once cool, you will be able to pick up the sulfur from the water and play with it, although it...

How To: Use a Dean Stark apparatus in the chemistry lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

Do Not Try This at Home: Exploding Hydrogen Bubbles

Here at WonderHowTo, we love science. And of course, explosions. So, naturally we find Gray Matter's demonstration of fiery hydrogen bubbles pretty awesome. But the most interesting part is the reason behind the demonstration. Did you know the same gas that heats your house can also make it explode? Gray Matter explains why:

How To: Make a chemical indicator from kitchen items

In this tutorial, we learn how to make a chemical indicator from kitchen items. First, make an indicator by grabbing some red cabbage and some vodka. Now, heat up some water until it's boiling, then place a smaller beaker inside the water with vodka inside of it. Place the red cabbage inside of the smaller beaker, then stir it up and let sit for 10 minutes. A lot of the color will come out with the cabbage being inside of the alcohol. After this, pour this into a storage bottle and pour the w...

How To: Freeze water by boiling acetone

You can freeze water by boiling it. To do this you will need a Vacuum pump. Vacuum pump can be used to suck out air from a container and create vacuum in it. Take a bell jar. Now connect the vacuum pipe into it and suck out the air from it. Take a flash and add little bit of water to it. Now we want to freeze this water. Add some acetone to it. Acetone boils and evaporates very quickly. Add a few chips of marble to it. These will enable in boiling of the water. Now set this flask in the bell ...

How To: Turn Your Computer into a Pulse Monitor

Have you ever wanted to see your heartbeat, but without the stress of having to be in the hospital? You can with this easy, step-by-step guide to turn your computer in a pulse monitor to check your heart rate from the comfort of your own chair. Check the beating of your heart after a workout to see how fast your blood is pumping or watch it drop after a soothing day at the spa or a nice bubble bath. The easy to follow video tutorial is set to a funky beat that is sure to get your blood (and f...

How To: Experiment with magnets and eddy currents

Eddy Currents are little circles of electricity created when metals are moved by magnets or even when magnets are moved by metals. To understand this practically take a regular piece of cardboard and drop it in between a horse shoe magnet. It drops normally with out being effected by the magnet. This is because the cardboard does not conduct electricity. Therefore it does not cause any eddy currents. But instead if you use an aluminum piece in the same way, it falls very slowly, because alumi...

How To: Carry out a titration in the lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...