Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Analyze cheap sulfuric acid for concentration & purity

In this home scientist video the instructor Robert Bruce talks about cheap sulfuric acid. He says that sulfuric acid is very important in any lab both as a reagent and a precursor for preparing other chemicals. He points to the battery acid saying that it is a good source of sulfuric acid which is 35% concentrated. Now he shows various methods to obtained sulfuric acid and shows how to test one of the thus obtained sulfuric acid for its concentration. In this video the author talks about sulf...

How To: Make boric acid from borax

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to make boric acid from borax. For this experiment you will need borax (disodium tetra borate) and conc. hydrochloric acid. Take 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and dilute it with 75 ml of water. Next take 6 - 7 gms of borax and dissolve it in boiling water. Now add equal amount of hydrochloric acid. Crystals of boric acid will start forming. They are completely insoluble in cold water. After about half an hour, fi...

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

How To: Create napalm

This video illustrates how to make napalm. You will need a petri dish, gasoline, and styrofoam to create napalm. Combining the styrofoam and gasoline in a petri dish you allow the styrofoam to dissolve and become a semi-solid substance. It will have the consistency of chewing gum and it will be highly flammable. This substance will be sticky and if lit it should be lit outside and at a distance from anyone as it will produce a gas that is toxic.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Make a permanent, reusable glow stick

Make a reusable glow stick, glow-in-the-dark-style! Imagine, you'll never have to buy one of those ChemLite's again, because you can reuse this homemade glow stick over and over again. This video tutorial will show you how to make a permanent, reusable glow stick. The materials in this experiment are simple: epoxy resin, straw, and some phosphor powder.

How To: Freeze a beaker to wood

Chemistry can be very fun when you create different kinds of reactions between elements. Note that caution should be employed to not harm yourself while performing these reactions. Ammonium Tricynate reacts with barium hydroxide octahydrate in endothermic form. Endothermic reactions are those which absorb heat from the surroundings during the reactions as opposed to exothermic reactions which produce a lot of heat during the reaction. When endothermic reaction occurs, depending up on the inte...

How To: Reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces

In this tutorial, we learn how to reveal latent fingerprints on paper & other surfaces. The item you will need to do this is crystal iodine and plastic sheeting to protect your work surface. Place your specimen into a plastic container with the iodine, then put the top on and let sit, placing your hand under to warm it up. Within a few minutes you will see a violet color vaporizing in the container. When finished, you will be able to take out your specimen and see the fingerprints that are al...

How To: Build a real lava lamp

This is how to make a near professional grade lava lamp. We did this as a chemistry project. We perfected it in a week. This took many hours to do, as we had to get the density just right. We remade it three times, also. At the very end, we combined all of the wax into a huge flask. And then it blew up.

How To: Use a protractor to measure the height of any object

In this video, we learn how to use a protractor to measure the height of any object. First, attach a level to the protractor, followed by a straw at the 45 degree angle. Next, walk back form the object while looking through the straw. Keep walking back until you spot the top of the object through the straw, then measure to the base of the object. After this, you will have an isosceles triangle that has two equal sides. Use these sides to help find what the size of the object is. After this, a...

How To: Create an erupting volcano

In this tutorial, we learn how to create an erupting volcano. First, take ammonium dichromate and pour it into a clear plastic dish. Next, grab a blow torch and blow it onto the material. This will make a substance that is black and looks like ash. This will get messy, so make sure you have a newspaper or cloth underneath the dish. Eventually, the material will catch on fire so you can remove the blow torch, then the ash will fall all around the volcano and the sparks will fly out of the midd...

How To: Use superglue to reveal latent fingerprints

Do you need to check a scene for prints, or are maybe just curious about the techniques of forensic science? In this video, Robert Bruce Thompson from the Home Scientist unravels the mysterious of forensic fingerprinting using common materials that you may already have sitting around in your home right now. Explains and demonstrates the process of superglue fuming step-by-step to reveal latent fingerprints. Includes great tips on how to improve and speed up the process using household products.