Hot Science Experiments Posts

How To: Isolate the sugar in a can of soda

In this video from ScienceOnTheBrain we learn how to isolate the sugar in a can of soda. To find out how much sugar is in soda, pour a can into a pot and boil it until all the water is gone. You will be left with the sugar, and then you can weigh it. First weigh your pot before pouring the soda in. Now boil the soda on the stovetop. When the water evaporates, you'll be left with a syrupy sugar. A can of soda has 39 grams of sugar in it. That equates to about 7 1/2 teaspoons. Fruit juice conta...

How To: Rip a Penny in Half

No, we're not lying. But before you try and tear a plain old penny in half, you should probably watch this video first or you may hurt your fingers. While ordinary pennies are very, very difficult to rip, if you get rid of the zinc core you are left with only the thin copper shell, which is itself very easy to tear apart.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

How To: Make boric acid from borax

This is a video tutorial in the Education category where you are going to learn how to make boric acid from borax. For this experiment you will need borax (disodium tetra borate) and conc. hydrochloric acid. Take 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and dilute it with 75 ml of water. Next take 6 - 7 gms of borax and dissolve it in boiling water. Now add equal amount of hydrochloric acid. Crystals of boric acid will start forming. They are completely insoluble in cold water. After about half an hour, fi...

How To: Create a Miniature Fireworks Show by Burning Steel Wool & Potassium Chlorate

We've all seen some the awesome fireworks that steel wool can produce, either in person or on video— and as simple as it is, we just can't get enough of it! It's really basic chemistry, but sometimes simplicity can amaze more than complexity. And in this video, our favorite web scientist, NurdRage, battles the burning flame of one of the world's most common household item, i.e. the Brillo Pad. Plus, there's an even bigger reaction towards the end with an added chemical compound).

How To: Draw the Lewis structure for carbon dioxide & methanol

In this Education video tutorial you are going to learn how to draw the Lewis structure for carbon dioxide & methanol. Carbon dioxide is CO2. Oxygen atoms don’t bond together. So, carbon atom has to be in the center. Oxygen has 6 valence electrons and carbon has 4. Hence, carbon wants to form 4 bonds and each oxygen atom wants to form 2 bonds. So, two each electrons of carbon will bond with 2 electrons of each oxygen atom. The Lewis structure for CO2 will be ( …. O=C=O….). The 4 dots within t...

How To: Break a yardstick with atmospheric pressure

This video shows you how to break a yardstick with atmospheric pressure. The instructor first lays a ruler halfway on and off of a table. He then covers half the ruler with newspaper. The instructor states that you can chop the ruler in half with your hand because the air holding down the paper will keep the ruler in place. The experiment does work correctly and he did break it in half perfectly. This instructor seems to have many similar videos on the subject.

How To: Discover the Hidden Colors in Everyday Objects with This DIY Video Spectrometer

A spectrometer is a device that splits light into all of the different colors it's composed of that can't be seen with the naked eye. It does this by using a prism to refract or bend the light. Jeffrey Warren over at Public Labs created a tutorial showing how you can make your own video spectrometer and create spectra like the one pictured below. Any guesses as to what the subject is? Believe it or not, that's what whipped cream looks like when viewed through a spectrometer. You can do this w...

How To: Make copper sulfate crystals

Learn how to make a copper sulfate crystal. Warning: Copper sulfate is not good for your skin, so if you get any on it, clean well with water. If you eat it, call a doctor. You will need once cleaned out egg with a hole in the top, some copper sulfid (you can get it in garden shops), and 60 ml of hot water. Easy way to make your own crystals.

How To: Hollow out a penny

In this video, we learn how to hollow out a penny. First, you need pennies that are dated after 1982, muriatic acid, a plastic container, and sandpaper. First, rub the edge of the penny on sandpaper until the silver color is exposed. Do this on two pennies, then place them in the plastic container. Now, while wearing gloves, pour the acid into the container so the pennies are completely covered. Now the pennies will start to bubble, leaves these in the acid for around six hours. Next, pour th...

How To: Make a homemade hot air balloon

Think a hot air balloon is something you can only read about in books? Think again. In this six-part science based tutorial, learn how to make your very own hot air balloon using science & the following easy to find materials: plastic bags, plastic drinking straws, thin candles, aluminun foil, tape, and scissors.

How To: Build parachutes with household materials

In this video, we learn how to build parachutes with household materials. You will need: a long string, Mylar, mesh, plastic, scissors, tape, and a weight. To get started, you will first cut your plastic or mesh into a circle or octagon shape. Then, take your string and cut it into several pieces. Then, tape the strings onto your material all around. After this, tie your weight to the strings so it's fully secured. Now, go to somewhere high and throw down your item! The parachute will help ke...