Hot Science Experiments How-Tos

How To: Make Potassium Chlorate from Ordinary Household Bleach and Salt Substitute

If you're not just a chemistry nerd, but also a firearms freak and explosives nut, then this home brew chemistry concoction is just what you need for some cheap homemade potassium chlorate. It's a mixture of potassium, chlorine and oxygen (KClO3) and is used for such things as gun primers, propellents, and explosives (when mixed with the appropriate fuel). And guess what? NurdRage is going to show you the steps for this makeshift potassium chlorate.

How To: Make Your Own Homemade Glow Sticks

The first glow sticks were patented by the US Navy in the 70s, but back then, they were called "Chemiluminescent Signal Devices." Today, glow sticks are still used by the military, emergency services, campers, divers and, of course, ravers. I may be done with the glow-in-the-dark parties from my college days, but I still think glow sticks are pretty legit, and always thought it would be awesome to make some for myself. Talk about a cool application for all those boring chemistry lectures.

How To: Make fireballs you can hold in your hand

This flame you CAN hold, without burning your skin off. Learn to make fireballs you can hold in your hand. This amazing video tutorial shows you how to do it. All you'll need for this little science experiment or fiery weapon is 100% cotton cloth, scissors, lighter fuel, cotton string, and a needle. Be careful to follow the directions in this how-to video carefully otherwise you'll really be playing with fire.

Classic Chemistry: Colorize Colorless Liquids with "Black" Magic, AKA the Iodine Clock Reaction

Want to make boring old colorless water brighten up on command? Well, you can control the color of water with this little magic trick. Actually, it's not really magic, but a classic science experiment known commonly as the iodine clock reaction, which uses the reactions between water and chemicals to instantly colorize water, seemingly by command. You can use different colorless chemicals to produce different colors, and you can even make the color vanish to make the water clear again.

Make Slime Without Borax: 5 Easy Recipes for Gooey Homemade Ooze

One of the only things I remember from watching Nickelodeon as a kid is the epic green slime. Looking back, I don't know what was so great about it, but every kid my age thought that being drenched in slime would be the coolest thing on earth. Of course, the first thing I did was beg my parents to buy me some fake slime, but I never knew I could've easily made my own at home. One of the most common ways to make slime is to combine liquid glue with water and a household chemical called borax. ...

How To: Convert grams to moles for chemistry

310tutoring shows viewers how to easily convert Grams to Moles for Chemistry. If you have 120 grams NaOH and we want this in moles we need a periodic table. Now, you need to figure out what the mass is of each individual element in NaOH. You need the mass of Na, O and H. Na mass is 23, O has 16 and H is 1. Add all of these up to get the molar mass of NaOH is 40 g/mol. Now use this to convert 120 g to moles. Now take 120 grams NaOh and multiply this by 1 mol NaOH/ 40 grams NaOH. You can cancel...

How To: Make non-Newtonian slime mixing cornflour and water

In this tutorial, we learn how to make slime by mixing corn flour and water. To start, you will need corn flour, water, and two plastic containers. First, pour the corn flour into one plastic container and then add in some water with food coloring to the mix. After this, mix the combination together until it makes a paste. Add more water or corn flour as you mix. When finished, grasp the mix in your hands and it will start to turn into slime! You can color this with any color food coloring, b...

How To: Light an energy saving bulb without plugging it

This video shows the viewer how to light an energy saving light bulb without plugging it in. The process is also explained in detail during the video. To light the bulb you need to inflate a standard balloon. Then rub the balloon over either a fabric or your hair. Then move the balloon back and forth near the light bulb. The bulb should glow dimly. This effect occurs because the balloon is negatively charged. This means that it has more electrons than protons. The video then goes on to explai...

How To: Test if a high-voltage diode is functioning properly using direct current

If your microwave oven is broken, it might be because the diode has gone bad. If you think that may be the culprit, you might want to test it. In the hobbies world, high-voltage diodes are often used to make high-voltage power supplies, but if you take it from a broken microwave oven, this video will show you how to test the diode for proper functionality using a direct current (DC) power supply.

How To: Use a protractor to measure the height of any object

In this video, we learn how to use a protractor to measure the height of any object. First, attach a level to the protractor, followed by a straw at the 45 degree angle. Next, walk back form the object while looking through the straw. Keep walking back until you spot the top of the object through the straw, then measure to the base of the object. After this, you will have an isosceles triangle that has two equal sides. Use these sides to help find what the size of the object is. After this, a...

How To: Light candles with a microwave oven

Say you're hosting a birthday party and the birthday girl's cake needs to be lit up, but you've just run out of matches. What to do? While you can certainly go to the store and purchase more, doing so would take at least half an hour (an eternity to wait for little kids), it's probably easier to make a flame with what you've got at home.

How To: Dissect a lamb's heart

Pull out your scissors and get ready to dissect a heart! No scalpel needed! Just like your very own biology class, but in a video. Watching this lamb heart anatomy tutorial will show you the approximate workings of a human heart. You'll see how to start with just the tools and a heart, to learning the anatomy, like the ventricles and certain tissue.

How To: Carry out a titration in the lab

The Interactive Lab Primer (ILP) has been developed as part of the Royal Society of Chemistry Teacher Fellowship Scheme, one of the themes of the Chemistry for Our Future program, and initiative which aims to secure a strong and sustainable future for the chemical sciences in higher education. The aim of the ILP is to address the diverse range of experience and skills students bring with them to a university by offering a resource to support their transition from school to the university chem...

How To: Do colorful electrolysis

No, colorful electrolysis has got nothing to do with zapping the hair off of a punk rocker's head. Electrolysis of water, according to Wikipedia, is "the decomposition of water (H2O) into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen gas (H2) due to an electric current being passed through the water." In this video, you'll watch in amazement as a young scientist colorful electrolysis to transform ordinary water into a psychedelic display.

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