Hot Science Experiments How-Tos

How To: Measure the volume of a balloon

Here we will demonstrate how to measure the volume of a balloon. A balloon is not a straight edged polygon shape, usually, so the mathematical equations get that much harder, on the flip side, it may be a spherical or ovalish shape, but measurements with math alone are detrimental due to the uneven sizes of the balloon. Here is how to do it properly. You will need a bucket, preferably, to hold water, a larger container than your original bucket, and a measuring container. Place the bucket ins...

How To: Build a potato battery

Like a lemon, a potato can produce electricity. This science experiment was prepared by Ebtisam Al Anzoor and demonstrated by Mustafa Daif. The electricity is proven using an analog micro ameter. The positive is copper from a penny or copper coin while the negative is a galavanized nail. The potato releases a charge and is further proven when it is connected to a calculator. You can daisy chain the potatoes for a greater charge.

How To: Use gentian violet to reveal latent fingerprints

This video would be very interesting for those seeking careers or those interested in the field of criminal science. This field involves forensic science. The video explains to us how to use gentian violet in order reveal latent fingerprints. He explains to us the experiment he is about to do before he does it. Genetian violet is a type of dye solution that can be very helpful in retrieving fingerprints. Safety goggles and gloves should be worn at all times.

How To: Make an amazing floating static orb

Learn how to make this spooky, amazing floating static orb. This is so simple, and so cool. It uses static electricity to make a tinsel orb levitate above a PVC pipe. We've gotten the orb to float for over 10 minutes. We just discovered you can use a regular balloon instead of the PVC pipe, but we like the pipe best. Watch the video, and then make your own!

How To: Make hydrochloric acid from salt

In this tutorial, we learn how to make hydrochloric acid from salt. First, you will pour some salt into a distil flask. After this, you will add in some concentrated sulfuric acid to the salt. Next, you will let these react with each other. You will start to see gasses bubble up and the excess hydrogen chloride gas come out through the top of the tube. To create a stronger reaction, you can add heat underneath the reaction. Then, test this by exposing it to ammonium chloride. If it's the righ...

How to Be Your Own SpaceX: Design, Build & Test Liquid-Fueled Rocket Engines

Move over NASA— SpaceX is taking over. Well, not really. But today, the privately funded spacecraft company broke all expectations when their Dragon capsule fell to a soft landing in the Pacific Ocean, completing an undoubtedly successful demo flight of nearly two full trips around Earth. It was the first re-entry of a commercial spacecraft ever, bringing commercial space transportation closer to reality.

How To: Make an erupting volcano with soap

In this video tutorial, viewers learn how to make an erupting volcano with soap. Begin by adding some vinegar into a flask/baker. Then add some soap into the vinegar and stir it by shaking the flask/baker. Users may choose to add some food coloring to make the mix look more like lava. In a separate, add some water and baking soda. Then stir it to mix. Pour the baking soda solution into the soap and vinegar mixture. This video will benefit those viewers who are interested in science and experi...

How To: Make your own thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates

The price of TLC plates can add up. See how to make thin-layer chromatography plates (TLC plates) for a few cents each that are as good as commercial TLC plates that sell for a dollar or two each. You can use these home-made TLC plates the same way you'd use chromatography paper, but the plates provide sharper separations and require far less analyte. They also lie flat, and are much easier to store for later reference. For more information, including step-by-step instructions, and to get sta...

How To: Draw the Lewis dot structures for 2 types of alcohol

In this video, you will learn how to draw the Lewis Dot structure for CH3CH2OH, or drinking alcohol. To draw the first type of alcohol, draw H, C, C, O, and H horizontally. Now draw, an H above and below both C. Draw the dot structures in between each letter. Hydrogen has one valance electrons, Carbon has four, and Oxygen has six. Now, connect the Lewis Dot Structures. If you are given C2H6O, write down C, O, and C horizontally. Draw a line between the O and the C's. The Carbons will have thr...

How To: Stiffen water with flour and salt

See what happens when you mix a few cooking ingredients into water! This video tutorial will show you the trick to stiffen water with flour and salt. It's a pretty simple trick, and you don't need to be a science genius to do it. Just mix a little salt and flour together, then dump into the pre-boiled water and watch as it hardens completely stiff.

How To: Make a never ending foam snake

In this video the author shows how to make a never ending foam snake. He starts by speaking about how hydrogen peroxide can be fun. He starts with the requirements first which are a dish soap, a bottle of hydrogen peroxide, some dry yeast, and a red fruit color. Now he fills up a cup with hydrogen peroxide, adds the color and two table spoons of dish soap. Now he shows how to use yeast which is used to remove the oxygen from the hydrogen peroxide. And finally he demonstrates the never ending ...

How To: Make a bouncing translucent egg

Check out this video to see how to x-ray an egg and make it bounce. This is a cool science experiment that can be done with simple kitchen ingredients. Just get one raw egg and soak it with a cup of vinegar. Let it sit and soak for a couple days and it will feel like rubber. The egg shell will no longer be white, and it will bounce just like a ball, however... it is not a ball so it will break! This is one cool translucent bouncing egg.

How To: Turn pennies into silver and gold coins with zinc

One of the most famous and repeated chemistry experiments involves money. Some would say this is more of a trick than an experiment, but you can be the judge of that. No one can just turn pennies into silver or gold coins, but someone with a few chemicals can. So, if you want to cooler cents in your pocket, try out this chemistry trick yourself. Nurd Rage (Dr. Lithium) shows you how to turn pennies into silver and gold coins using zinc.

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